The Law Applicable to Contractual Obligations and Non-Contractual Obligations (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018

The purpose of this instrument is to ensure that the European Union (EU) rules that determine the law applicable to contractual and non-contractual obligations continue to operate effectively in domestic law after the UK’s exit from the EU. Those EU rules are contained, in particular, in Regulation (EC) No 593/2008 on the law applicable to contractual obligations (“Rome I”) and Regulation (EC) No 864/2007 on the law applicable to non-contractual obligations (“Rome II”).
https://www.gov.uk/eu-withdrawal-act-2018-statutory-instruments/the-law-applicable-to-contractual-obligations-and-non-contractual-obligations-amendment-etc-eu-exit-regulations-2018

The Criminal Justice (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018

The Criminal Justice (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 (“the Criminal Justice SI” or “the SI”) are made using powers in the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (“the Act”). Its purpose is to address failures in retained EU law to operate effectively and other deficiencies arising from the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) by amending the domestic legislation which implemented five EU criminal justice measures.
https://www.gov.uk/eu-withdrawal-act-2018-statutory-instruments/the-criminal-justice-amendment-etc-eu-exit-regulations-2018

The Guardian view on surveillance: Australia is giving too much power to the state | Editorial

Laws on encryption must not pose an unwarranted danger to the freedom and privacy of citizensThe Australian government has just hustled into law a wide-ranging bill which attempts to give its intelligence services powers against encrypted communications. Whatever the government may wish, there are of course limits set to these powers by the mathematics that underpin strong encryption. If it is properly implemented, strong encryption is quite literally unbreakable for the foreseeable future. That is why it has become an essential part of the modern world, sustaining, among other things, the whole of our banking system. No government could really wish it to be weakened, because that would unleash international anarchy. But no government can be entirely happy with it either, for it does make safer a great deal of criminal and terrorist activity. Last week’s law is the latest in a series of more or less unhappy compromises between the demands of security, privacy and human rights.

At one extreme there is the Chinese policy, which abolishes privacy and human rights entirely in the interests of state power. A mesh of digital surveillance holds every citizen a virtual prisoner and strips them of privacy. This is most highly developed in the repression that has clamped down on the western province of Xinjiang, but ultimately it is clear that everyone in China will be judged by their “social credit” score, derived from all of their actions, online and off, which have ever been digitised. Any company that does business in China, as Apple does, Google plans to do, and Facebook yearns to, will find that it cooperates with the state.

Continue reading…

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/dec/10/the-guardian-view-on-surveillance-australia-is-giving-too-much-power-to-the-state

News story: Home Secretary opens bidding process for Youth Endowment Fund

Sajid Javid has launched the bidding process to choose an organisation or consortium that will run the £200 million Youth Endowment Fund.
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/home-secretary-opens-bidding-process-for-youth-endowment-fund

Promotional material: Strengthening probation, building confidence consultation events and materials

The Ministry of Justice is running a number of engagement events for those with an interest in the future of probation services.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/strengthening-probation-building-confidence-consultation-events-and-materials

Promotional material: Youth endowment fund: call for proposals

Information for organisations interested in bidding to run the youth endowment fund.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/youth-endowment-fund-call-for-proposals

News story: Home Secretary opens bidding process for youth endowment fund

Sajid Javid has launched the bidding process to choose an organisation or consortium that will run the £200 million youth endowment fund.
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/home-secretary-opens-bidding-process-for-youth-endowment-fund

Promotional material: Youth endowment fund: call for proposals

Information for organisations interested in bidding to run the youth endowment fund.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/youth-endowment-fund-call-for-proposals

Consultation outcome: Amending the Advocates’ Graduated Fee Scheme

Seeking views on proposals for allocating an additional £15 million of spending to the Advocates’ Graduated Fee Scheme and proposals for distributing this additional expenditure.
https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/amending-the-advocates-graduated-fee-scheme